ProjectAtoll

Marshall Islands

Summer 2017

There is no ecosystem more vulnerable to climate change than the low-lying atolls of the tropical Pacific. Rising sea levels are an existential threat to a collection of islands of unsurpassed natural beauty, to archaeological sites representing centuries of history, and most importantly to the families that have lived on these islands for generations. In summer 2017 a team of scientists and athletes will travel to the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), an archipelago of low-lying coral atolls and volcanic islands, spread across more than 750,000 square miles of the Equatorial Pacific. Traveling under human power the expedition team will circumnavigate one of the outer islands - Likiep Atoll - taking samples, recording bathymetry and using cutting edge technology (drones, pressure sensors, radiocarbon dating) to gain a better understanding of how these islands are being affected by a rising ocean. The outcome of the ProjectAtoll expedition will be a digital record of a dynamic marine system, improving our knowledge of how these atolls respond to climate change and giving us a deeper understanding of their vulnerability. 


In Franklin's Footsteps

A painting HMS Erebus in the Ice, 1846, by Francois Etienne Musin, 19th century.

A painting HMS Erebus in the Ice, 1846, by Francois Etienne Musin, 19th century.

With the recent underwater discoveries of Sir John Franklin’s two flagships, the mystery of what happened to Franklin and his team may be finally coming to a close. A team of 6 athlete-adventurers will embark to King William Island in the Canadian Arctic to retrace the supposed route of Captain Sir John Franklin’s doomed crew, to gain a better understanding of what it would have been like to have lived and travelled through this region without the ancient knowledge of the inuit, in tribute to the men who died here. . The 100-mile trek will be the first continuous exploration of the coastline and will aim to identify new archaeological sites, as well as record coastline location, and features as part of a larger, global sea level rise project. This desolate, and water-logged landscape will test this core team of experienced athletes and adventurers. 

Map showing the search routes for Sir John Franklin’s lost (and recently found) ships. The larger, more southern blue circle indicates the area that Erebus was found, whereas the smaller more northern blue circle indicates the area that the Terror has allegedly been found. (Map: Chris Brackley/Canadian Geographic)

Map showing the search routes for Sir John Franklin’s lost (and recently found) ships. The larger, more southern blue circle indicates the area that Erebus was found, whereas the smaller more northern blue circle indicates the area that the Terror has allegedly been found. (Map: Chris Brackley/Canadian Geographic)


Thailand Fossil Expedition

Screen Shot 2017-01-19 at 1.06.27 PM.png

In partnership with the Thai government, Adventure Science is leading a team of athletes and adventurers into the jungle in search of undiscovered dinosaur fossils and tracks. Although known to have important
paleontological deposits, the target region has been lightly explored as a whole, but is on trend with past discoveries. In a land where many of the finds are made by well informed local villagers, there is significant potential for discoveries to be made during this two week long project.


Beyond Roads III: Return to the Musandam

The Adventure Science team has attempted to complete this traverse twice, and has been rebuffed by the difficult terrain, and waterless conditions. With no maps or data on the area, all progress is into the unknown. Although there are tiny fishing camps scattered along the coast, this mountainous region has not seen westerners visit it’s interior plateaus and peaks in well over 70 years. Over two field seasons, the team has explored extensively in this region, accessing difficult to reach areas in human-powered and self supported style. Along the way they’ve discovered dozens of archaeological sites, and have seen everything from historic animal leg traps left out to protect flocks from Caracals and Leopards, to metre high pottery vessels entombed in collapsed structures. This year they will return to tackle what appears to be the crux of the route, the 800 metre high peak that looms above the village of Ash Shishah, and finish the traverse by walking back into Khasab.